Photogram: Work by Former Faculty and Staff

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The Helen E. Copeland Gallery (HECG) and the School of Art at Montana State University are pleased to announce the opening of Photogram: Work by Former Faculty and Staff on exhibit Tuesday, February 20 through Thursday, March 1, 2018.  A public reception will be held Thursday, March 1, 2018 from 6:00 – 8:00 pm, in the Helen E. Copeland Gallery, located on the second floor of the School of Art in Haynes Hall. This free event is open to the public. Hors d’oeuvres will be served.

In celebration of the 125th anniversary of Montana State University, Photogram: Work by Former Faculty and Staff showcases the work of 22 former members of the School and Art faculty and staff.  The exhibit begins with a watercolor by F.E. Marshall, the first head of the Art Department in 1894, and ends with the work of Stephanie Newman, graphic designer, who retired in 2017.  

Spanning the 125 years the department has educated Montanans in the creative arts, the showcase also includes works by Olga Ross Hannon, Harold Schlotzhauer, Deborah Butterfield, John Buck, Frances Senska, George Conkey, Willem Volkersz, Jesse Albrecht, Kathryn W. Schmidt, Robert Royhl, John Bashor, Rick Pope, Fran Noel, Jessie Wilber, Robert and Gennie DeWeese, Richard Helzer, Mary Anne Kelly, Anne Garner, and a special piece by Peter Voulkos.  Though the show is on display for a limited time, it features the enduring art of some of the finest artists Montana has to offer.

In addition, there will be a “timeline wall” dedicated to chronicling the rich history of the MSU School of Arts.  Posted on the wall with dates of importance, (such as building of the Archie Bray with the help of Rudy Autio, Voulkos, Senska, and Wilber in 1951 and the birth of KGLT radio in 1968) will be old photographs, building plans, exhibition posters, and other ephemera from the past 125 years.  Post-it notes will be provided for  visitors to contribute by posting events they feel are important to the expansive story of the School of Art in an effort to create a robust depiction of the institution’s history.

The exhibition is titled Photogram in hopes of illustrating the importance of teachers in creating the next generation of artists.  While searching for a title, Gallery Director and curator Ella Watson wanted to find an art process that personified the idea of taking parts to make a whole as each student adopts pieces of their professors to make their own voice.  Looking through the MoMA Glossary, she found this definition of photogram: a photographic print made by placing objects and other elements on photosensitive paper and exposing it to light.

According to Watson, “I was not content with a process that describes taking shreds of a whole and making into something new as in a collage or a montage.  The parts do not undergo a chemical change and they give the idea of a Frankenstein of a student.  Hence, I was enamored with the metaphor of a photogram: the students are the objects, the paper is MSU, and the light (in the true meaning of the Enlightenment) is the knowledge of the professors.  The resulting image is all its own, but not without the influence of the sun.”

Continuing the 125th Celebration of MSU, Photogram will be followed by Jessie Wilber: A Pioneer of Modernism in Montana, a retrospective of the work of Jessie Wilber and guest curated by Michele Corriel.  Funding to frame the collection of prints and woodblocks by Wilber, which come from the School of Art Archives, was provided by the Center for Western Lands and Peoples.  This exhibit will continue through March 22.

Finally, being exhibited concurrently with Photogram and Jessie Wilber for the month of March, is a retrospective of the work of Robert and Gennie DeWeese on display in the Dean’s Gallery on the second floor of Cheever Hall, adjacent to Haynes Hall.   

The Helen E. Copeland Gallery is located on the second floor of Haynes Hall. Please note that the parking passes are required for parking during the business day (6AM – 6PM). Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday, 9AM – 5PM/ Closed on weekends
For more information on this exhibition, or on the Helen E. Copeland gallery in general, please follow us on Facebook at facebook.com/msuhecg.

VOX POP is NOW!!!

VOX POPULI POSTER 2018-submission
We thank our donors for their generous donation to the gallery and for supporting our student’s education.
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What is Vox Populi?
The title “Vox Populi” means “Voice of the People.” Vox Populi is the annual undergraduate juried exhibition, which takes place at the Helen E. Copeland Gallery, located on the second floor of the School of Art Haynes Hall on the Montana State University Bozeman campus. The juried competition is open to all undergraduate students currently enrolled at MSU Bozeman, to showcase the diverse range of art methods, techniques and skills of the MSU student body.  In addition, the jurying process is meant to encourage and inform students about professional practices.

When is Vox Populi taking place?
The exhibition dates are Monday, February 5 th – Thursday, February 14 th (2 Weeks).  There will be a public reception on Thursday, February 8th, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM.

Who may submit artwork?
Any current undergraduate student enrolled at MSU Bozeman. This includes Special Students.

Who will be this year’s jurors?
Dalton C. Brink, Artistic Director of the Rialto and Founder of the Cottonwood Club
Bruce VanLandingham,  Executive Director of Sundog Fine Art
Greta Hagg, Managing Director of Sundog Fine Art

What is the raffle?
There will be a drawing for raffle prizes for entries; you will receive one raffle ticket per completed entry form.  Your work does not need to be accepted into the exhibition to win a raffle prize.  The winning tickets will be drawn at the opening reception on Thursday, February 8th at 7:00 pm.  Please note that you must be present at the reception to collect your prize.

I was accepted into the exhibition. When can I collect my work after the exhibition?
The exhibition dates are Monday, February 5 th – Thursday, February 14 th.  You may collect your work on Friday, February 15th from 9am – 5pm.  Please note that due to the lack of storage space, work must be collected at the above mentioned times. The gallery is not responsible for lost or damaged art.

Where can I find the most current information regarding Vox Populi?
On this website and the Helen E. Copeland Facebook page.

 

 

 

 

Fay Peck: American Expressionist

poster flowers webThe Helen E. Copeland Gallery and the School of Art at Montana State University is pleased to announce the opening of Fay Peck: American Expressionist on exhibit from Monday, January 8th – Wednesday, January, 24th, 2018.  A public reception will be held on Thursday, January 18th from 6:00 – 8:00 pm, in the Helen E. Copeland Gallery, which is located on the second floor of the School of Art in Haynes Hall. This free event is open to the public. Hors d’oeuvres will be served.

Fay Peck: American Expressionist is an exhibition of works from the prolific career of the late Fay Peck, an internationally shown painter and printmaker who spent the final years of her life with her family in Bozeman.  Showcasing landscapes, portraits, and nudes from the extensive career of this little-known gem, Fay Peck: American Expressionist displays a portfolio through a very strong and empowered feminine lens.

With large-scale landscapes rich in impasto and vibrant hues, Peck’s landscapes have a physicality that encompasses the viewers full visual frame. According to Franz Schulz in Art in America:

 “Her technique is unstintingly painterly: bold, impetuously brushed color areas are ungirded by a strong, even willful line.  To see this kind of painting in today’s cool, impersonal art environment is to be impressed by the force of Fay’s commitment and courage in fashioning a vision of her own.”

An excellent juxtaposition to her landscapes, Peck’s nudes are adorned with retro patterns of the 70’s.  Speaking to Second-wave feminism of the time, Peck’s female gaze allows for the nude women to be depicted in their imperfect form with wide thighs and cellulite, yet retain their beauty. These nudes are not demure nor stoic nor stolid, but approachable while still demanding the viewer’s attention and respect.

The portraiture of Peck is equally engaging.  Trusting in her single gesture line, Peck’s people have individual personalities, humble with flaws and imperfections.  Using oil pastel over monotype, her figures are comical and playful, bringing a smile to the viewer’s pate. Of her drawings and prints, Rainer Michael Mason in the Tribune de Genéve stated:

 “One feels an authentic personality, full of ardor […] Her drawings, which do not lack fullness, contrast a background of floral tapestry with bodies which make the whiteness of the paper sing.”

Fay Peck was born in 1931 and grew up in River Forest, Illinois, where she acquired a great love of nature.  Peck attended University of Miami, and continued her education at summer programs at the University of Wisconsin and the University of Oslo, Norway.  While keeping her own studio at her home in Illinois, Peck often painted en plein air in private meadows and the outdoors of Snowmass, CO.  She participated in print workshops at the Anderson Ranch in Aspen, CO and at the Evanston Art Center in Evanston, IL where she studied under Paul Wieghardt.  Describing her outdoor practice, Peck stated:

 “I drove to locations in my station wagon or my Harvester Scout, which I owned for about 20 years.  I would load the back up with heavy Masonite boards, two palettes with mounds of fresh oil paint, two easels, a folding chair, six TV tray tables, a large basket of oil paints and brushes, and one or two German Shepherds.  It would take about four days on location.”

Peck’s work is included in the collections of Robert B. Meyer, Founder of the Chicago Museum of Art; Rice University; First National Bank of Chicago; the New York Stock Exchange; Goldman Sachs; and various US embassies. She was married to her husband for 45 years and is survived by her four children and ten grandchildren. Peck passed away in 2016, but not before she saw her granddaughter, Carling Peck, graduate at MSU School of Art with a degree in graphic design.

The Helen E. Copeland Gallery is located on the second floor of Haynes Hall. Please note that the parking passes are required for parking during the business day (6AM – 6PM).

Helen E. Copeland Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday, 9AM – 5PM/ Closed on weekends

For more information on this exhibition, or on the Helen E. Copeland gallery in general, please visit http://hecgallery.com or follow us on Facebook (http://facebook.com/msuhecg).

 

2017 BFA Thesis Exhibition

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Exhibition dates: Monday, December 4th   – Friday, December 15, 2017
Reception: Friday, December 15th 6:00 – 8:00 PM

The School of Art at Montana State University is pleased to announce the opening of the 2017 Fall BFA Thesis Exhibition at the Helen E. Copeland located on the second floor of the School of Art in Haynes Hall, Bozeman MT.  The show will be on exhibit Monday, December 4th   – Friday, December 15, 2017.  The Public Reception is Friday, December 15th from 6:00-8:00 p.m. and will be free and open to the public. Hors d’oeuvres will be served, as will a cash bar.

On view will be the thesis works of six emerging artists graduating with their Bachelors Degrees in Fine Art. A number of disciplines will be represented: drawing, painting, printmaking, ceramics, and sculpture.

For BFA graduates, the thesis exhibition represents an important transition period from student to working artist. It marks an end to academically assigned work, and the beginning of their individual research and artistic maturity. The exhibited works synthesize the growth of each artist over their years spent at MSU.

The following students will be in the exhibition: Nettie Davis, Melissa Dawn, Hayley Drury, Raechel Haverstick, Lindsey Redmond, and Bradly Strock.

The Helen E. Copeland Gallery is located on the second floor of Haynes Hall.  Please note that the parking passes are required for parking during the business day (6AM – 6PM).

Helen E. Copeland Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday, 9AM – 5PM / Closed on weekends

For more information on this exhibition, or on the Helen E. Copeland Gallery in general,  follow us on Facebook (http://facebook.com/msuhecg).

 

 

 

Quadrennial: Spectacular Buckles from the US and Abroad

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Quadrennial: Four Years of Spectacular Buckles from the U.S. and Abroad

Exhibition Dates: Tuesday, November 14th – Tuesday, November 21st, 2017
Reception: Thursday, November 16th, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Helen E. Copeland Gallery
213 Haynes Hall, Bozeman, MT 59717
https://hecgallery.com
Main Contact: Ella Watson, Gallery Director
Ella.watson@montana.edu
(406) 994-4501

The Helen E. Copeland Gallery and the School of Art at Montana State University is pleased to announce the opening of Quadrennial: Four Years of Spectacular Buckles from the U.S. and Abroad on exhibit from Tuesday the 14th until November 21st,. A public reception will take place on Thursday, November 16th, 2017 from 6:00-8:00 pm, at the Helen E. Copeland Gallery, which is located on the second floor of the School of Art in Haynes Hall. This free event is open to the public. Hors d’oeuvres will be served.

Quadrennial is an invitational exhibition of belt buckles by former participants of  “The World Championship Belt Buckle Competition:” an annual juried, virtual, and online exhibit, highlighting contemporary work within the belt buckle format. Bryan Petersen, the founder of The World Championship Belt Buckle Competition, and current professor of the Metals Department at MSU, is thrilled to have the physical buckles on display as year after year the exhibit has been a virtual one with a one-year online presence.

To create a physical archive of the competition, past WCBBC participant and juror, Nash Quinn, has designed a catalogue available through Blurb books that will be released in time for the exhibit’s opening.  Local Bozeman author Michele Corriel has written a forward for the catalogue. The array of artistic techniques highlighted in this exhibition include:  illustration, plastics, exotic materials, 3-D printing, fused glass on metal, lapidary, and lost wax casting. Contemporary buckle artists comment on narrative themes, gender issues, politics, technology, religion, mythology, and mortality, among many other themes.

This four-year project has taken advantage of our Northwestern Regions culture and lifestyle.  WCBBC has helped fund high-profile visiting artists for the MSU Metalsmithing program, bringing in new jurors annually.  WCBBC is the only exhibition of its kind in that it promotes contemporary art buckles, and elevating the discussion for what form a belt buckle can take.  Petersen has used the Monatana regionalism and cowboy stereotype to bring the world to Bozeman: buckle contestants are from across the globe. Finalists have come from UK, Switzerland, Mexico, Turkey, and Costa Rica to name a few.
According to Petersen, “The biggest challenge of is connecting with these artists and what continues to motivate me to host the event.  Making an effort to promote the event worldwide is tough: there is a Facebook page and WCBBC is advertised on Klimt 02, a European website for jewelers out of Spain.  Mostly my job has been stalking buckle makers with an online presence and inviting them to submit to the juried competition.  During the six months leading up to the first competition, I can remember setting a goal of contacting at least 5 new artists a night.  Now it is easier since the event has a reputation and following, plus there is $500 in prize money, a chance at online exposure, and the possibility to be included in a physical catalog.”

The Helen E. Copeland Gallery is located on the second floor of Haynes Hall. Please note that the parking passes are required for parking during the business day (6AM – 6PM). Helen E. Copeland Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday, 9AM – 5PM/ Closed on weekends

For more information on this exhibition, or on the Helen E. Copeland gallery in general, please follow us on Facebook (http://facebook.com/msuhecg).

 

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DETECTING AMBIENT PRESSURE: An MFA Thesis Exhibition by Xander Clinthorne

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DETECTING AMBIENT PRESSURE: An MFA Thesis Exhibition by Xander Clinthorne
Exhibition dates: Monday, November 6 – Friday, November 10
Reception: Thursday, November 9 from 6:00pm-8:00pm
Helen E. Copeland Gallery
213 Haynes Hall, Bozeman, MT 59717
Main Contact: Ella Watson, Gallery Director
ella.watson@montana.edu
(406)994-4501

 The School of Art presents an MFA thesis exhibition by Xander Clinthorne at the Helen E. Copeland Gallery on the second floor of Haynes Hall. The art reception is free and open to the public.

On display is one artists interpretation of gathered creativity exercise results. Artwork will be exhibited in a dark room. If you do not have a smart phone with a flashlight, please bring a light.

Julie Grosche, MSU International Artist-in-Residence, at the HECG

Julie Gnosche poster WEB
Between Dog and Wolf: International Artist-in-Residence, Julie Grosche
Opening Reception, and Artist Lecture
Exhibition dates: Thursday, November 2nd
Artist Lecture: Thursday, November 2nd, 4:30 – 5:30 PM in Leon Johnson Room 339 on MSU Bozeman Campus
Reception: Thursday, November 2nd, 6:30 – 8:30 PM
Helen E. Copeland Gallery
213 Haynes Hall, Bozeman, MT 59717
https://hecgallery.com/
Main contact: Ella Watson, Gallery Director  

The School of Art at Montana State University is pleased to announce the opening of Between Dog and Wolf  by Julie Grosche, the MSU School of Art International Artist-in-Residence, at the Helen E. Copeland located on the second floor of Haynes Hall, Bozeman MT. The film that French artist has been creating during her residency will be on view November 2nd and 3rd.   The public reception will be held on Thursday, November 2nd from 6:30-8:30 p.m. The reception is free and open to the public.  Hors d’oeuvres will be served.

Preceding the reception, on November 2nd from 4:30-5:30 pm, Grosche will present an artist lecture in Room 339 in Leon Johnson Hall on MSU Bozeman Campus.

Grosche has been filming Between Dog and Wolf during her one month residency at MSU.  While dwelling in Bozeman, Grosche has traveled to the Pryor Mountains, Yellowstone, Hyalite Canyon, and other Montana locations to illustrate her narrative.  Using volunteers and students in the fictional film, Grosche’s research investigates the Medieval myth of the supernatural horse, Bayard.  A horse of extraordinary talents, Bayard is depicted in texts from the 12th – 19th centuries in France, Belgium, and the Netherlands.  Believed to be the progeny of a serpent and dragon who was freed from a mythical volcanic island, Bayard earned the ire of King Charlemagne by elongating his back and ferrying four knights who were escaping the king. Given to Charlemagne as a peace-offering for the offense, Bayard was thrown in the bottom of the Rhine with heavy stones around his neck.  Escaping this death, Bayard fled into the Ardennes Forest and, according to legend, can be heard neighing in the forest during the summer solstice.

Grosche transposed this myth from the European forests onto the landscape of Montana – itself a mythic site in the Western and American imagination. Fusing the image of the wild mustang and Bozeman local knowledge of the lands and horses, Grosche filmed the wilds of the Montana autumn to reconstruct a new legend:

“This piece is about dissecting an ancestral object filled with collective and personal memories, a key to the evolution of humanity, the dream of a young child, a strong animal often attributed to girl’s dreams, a vehicle, a weapon of war but also an image. The horse has always been portrayed by artists who fascinated by them, never stopped reproducing them. Like a sculptor, I’m defining it’s contours and through different stories, legends, and relations as I construct a new image.”

Between Dog and Wolf is a single-channel film accompanied by song and music created by Julie Grosche and musician Airport. Students have joined Grosche on outdoor ventures, learning from a career artist.  Gathering volunteers to demonstrate behaviors such as wrestling, breathing, and running in a pack-like manner, Grosche’s film tells the story of humans making a new way of life, as from the viewpoint of that mystical horse:

“Between myth and a cult I really try to interrogate systems of beliefs. Believing into a magical horse, reality TV, believing that we make empathetic choices, that the wind or solar energy is the future. In this video, a new group gather around a new belief, a new trend, a new diet, they codify their new religion built around worshipping a horse.”

Julie Grosche (b.1986, France) lives and works in Brooklyn, NY and Richmond, VA and is a graduate of Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Art in Dijon, France. Grosche has exhibited internationally including in NYC, Barcelona, Paris, Brussels, Cleveland, MIami, and Los Angeles. She co-founded PMgalerie in Berlin; Bcc, an itinerant curatorial platform; and ASMBLY based in NYC. She is the director of the Summer Studio Program at Virginia Commonwealth University.

For more information on Julie Grosche and her work, please visit www.juliegrosche.com.

The Helen E. Copeland Gallery is located on the second floor of Haynes Hall. Please note that the parking passes are required for parking during the business day (6AM-6PM).

For more information on this exhibition, or on the Helen E. Copeland Gallery in general, please follow us on Facebook (http://facebook.com/msuhecg.) For more information, please email the Gallery Director, Ella Watson at ella.watson@Montana.edu or call the School of Arts at (406) 994-4501.