“Live for a Day, Live for an Age” work by MFA Candidate, Soon Kim

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MFA Candidate Exhibition:  Soon Kim presents Live for a Day, Live for an Age”
Exhibition dates: Wednesday, October 31st  Friday, November 2nd, 2016
Thesis Defense: Tuesday, November 1st at 11:00 am
Reception: Thursday, November 3rd, 6:00 – 8:00 pm
Main contact: Ella Watson, Gallery Director
Ella.watson@montana.edu
(406) 994-4501

MFA Candidate, Soon Kim, presents “Live for a Day, Live for an Age at the Helen E. Copeland Gallery (HECG)  from October 31st  November 2nd.  The HECG is located on the second floor of the School of Art in Haynes Hall, Bozeman MT, on 11th Avenue, across from the Duck Pond. Kim will defend her thesis work on Tuesday, November 1st at 11:00 am in the gallery.  The public reception will be Thursday, November 3rd, 6:00 – 8:00 pm in the HECG.  Hors d’oeuvres and refreshments will be provided.  All events are free and open to the public.

The MFA Thesis exhibition is the culmination of an MFA candidates work over three years at the School of Art.  Born out of her battle with breast cancer, Kim’s work represents the quality of mortality in that it gives meaning and value to a persons actions and experiences:

In my painting, I combine science and art. My unique emphasis on time and identity coupled with organic cells and DNA sequences was inspired by my personal experience with breast cancer. During that particular time, I realized that one’s emotional state affects one’s perception of time and leads to a heightened awareness that extends even to the body. 

Humanity has a limited amount of time—usually this finite period is thought of as something bad. I would like to pose the idea that life’s brevity is what makes it beautiful. With unlimited time, we lose the beauty of the human experience. The same way an immortal cell becomes cancer, an immortal human loses their humanity. We’re human because we have limited time. Things seem to matter more the less time we have.

          Most of us focus too much on the past or worry too much about the future; we lose time because we fail to exist deeply in the present moment.  Therefore, I hope that my art inspires others to consider the weighty questions of “Who am I?” and “How do my views of time affect the way I live my life?”