Upstream of the Confluence

PRESS RELEASE

Upstream of the Confluence: a Woodfire Celebration
Monday, October 1st – Thursday, October 25th

East Fork at the Helen E. Copeland Gallery in Haynes Hall
213 Haynes Hall, Bozeman, MT 59717
Exhibition:  Monday, October 1st – Thursday, October 25th
Reception: Tuesday, October 16th, 6:00 – 8:00 pm

West Fork at the Waller-Yoblonsky Gallery at the Melvin Graduate Studios
2998 West Lincoln Street, Bozeman, MT 59718
Exhibition: Monday, October 14th – Friday, October 19th  
Reception: Tuesday, October 16th, 4:00 – 6:00 pm

Middle Fork  in the Beyond Gallery at the Melvin Graduate Studio
Exhibition and Reception: Tuesday, October 16th, 4:00 – 6:00 pm
Helena dates: TBD

Downstream Downfire in the Exit Gallery in the SUB
Located in the Strand Union Building
Strand Union Building Room 212
Exhibition: Monday, October 15th – Friday, October 26th
Reception: Wednesday, October 17th, 5:00 – 6:30 pm

final woodfire posterThe School of Art at Montana State University is pleased to announce the opening of a multi-part woodfire ceramics celebration, Upstream of the Confluence, occurring  Monday, October 1st – Thursday, October 25th. In conjunction with the “Cultural Confluence,” an international woodfire symposium in Helena on October 18th – 20th, the event at Montana State University will extend the celebration of woodfire traditions to Bozeman, highlighting the evolution and convergence of woodfire practices in creation of the contemporary.

The celebration will take place across campus including the Helen E. Copeland Gallery, the Waller-Yoblonsky Gallery, the Exit Gallery, and the Beyond Gallery (a new pop-up space that will be on display outside of the Waller-Yoblonsky the evening of Tuesday, October 16th).

Each gallery will be showcasing unique collections of woodfired ceramics created by Montana State students, alumni or staff, ranging in date from 1945 to present. The Helen E. Copeland Gallery exhibition, East Fork, curated by Ella Watson, Josh DeWeese, and Dean Adams, will display alumni and faculty work including include Rudy Autio, Peter Voulkos, professor emeritus Frances Senska, professors Dean Adams and Josh DeWeese, as well as former students Rachael Marne Jones, Kelsie Rudolph, Danielle O’Malley, Mark Kronfuss, Boomer Moore, Mat Rude and many more from Monday, October 1st – Thursday, October 25th.

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Al Tennant

The Waller-Yoblonsky Gallery will be hosting West Fork, showcasing art by current MFA students from Monday, October 14th – Friday, October 19th.  

Attendees at West Fork on October 16th will also have a chance to view student woodfire pieces in Middle Fork in the Beyond Gallery, the brainchild of MFA candidate and ceramicist, Jon Bashioum. The Beyond Gallery is a mobile gallery intended to promote arts in Montana. Installed in a 1987 MCI Motor Coach, the gallery is currently a work in progress and this show will be the first exhibition in this space after Phase I of renovations. Middle Fork will feature student work based around the theme of wood firing, portraying a respect for tradition and an enthusiasm for innovation.

On October 16th, reception for Middle Fork  and West Fork will take place from 4:00 – 6:00 pm at the Melvin Graduate Studios, followed by a reception for West Fork from 6:00 – 8:00 pm at the Helen E. Copeland Gallery.  Both receptions are free and open to the public.

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Chad Carignan

The Exit Gallery in the SUB will be hosting Downstream Downfire, showcasing undergraduate woodfire ceramics from Monday, October 15th – Friday, October 26th .  the MSU Ceramic Guild will be showing their collected woodfired work, exhibiting different techniques of firing and use of clay.  According to co-organizer, BFA student Matt Biasotti, “This work represents our struggle, love and addiction for wood fire ceramics.”  

There will also be a variety of woodfire burnings, as well as visiting artists throughout the month.  Dan Murphy, Associate Professor from Utah State University, and Julia Isidrez, Studio Artist from Paraguay will be giving ceramic demonstrations in the Ceramics Studio in Haynes Hall on MSU Campus on Thursday, October 11th, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm. Both will be lecturing later that afternoon, at 4:00 pm in Cheever 214.  Please visit http://www.hecgallery.com for more details on these events, including artist bios, directions, schedules, and kiln histories.

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Mat Rude

In 1889, Montana became a state. Fifty-six years later, Frances Senska moved the Ceramics program out of Home Economics and under the umbrella of the School of Arts with the assistance of Olga Ross Hannon, from whom Hannon Hall receives its namesake. Seventy-three years later, the School of Arts is proud to host this series of events, celebrating the ceramics program which has been around for more than half of Montana’s history.  Many alumni from MSU ceramics have thriving careers, creating everything from functional pottery to contemporary, conceptual works. However, what makes woodfire special is not just the works created, or the history of the department, but the community it inspires. 

As alum Mark Kronfuss, whose work will be in East Fork, states, “Living in a smaller community really lends itself in finding like minded folks. Ceramic artists seems to always find each other. No other medium in art brings a group of dedicated artists together to work collaboratively and share knowledge like ceramics does.”

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Nicholas Danielson

Wood firings take anywhere  from one to four days, during which the fire is continually stoked and kept alive by loyal, anticipating craftsman.  “Some of my closest friends and fondest college memories come from long days and hours spent prepping for and tending to a wood kiln,” Kronfuss recalls. 

Woodfiring unto itself is a dance with the heat, a slow burn that brings out the natural tones in the clay, whilst flames lick the muddy surface. There is a stronger element of chance with wood firing as compared with electric or gas kiln firings.  One cannot be sure where the work will be singed by the flames, and can only speculate how location in the kiln will impact how the incandescence will incinerate the material. The surface is often rough, but ripe with texture and nuances only available to the keen viewer that takes time investigating the work in the proper light.  Woodfiring is a process in which the artists surrenders much of their control to the blaze that they in turn feed and stoke, sometimes heartbroken, sometimes elated by the results.

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Robert “Boomer” Moore
While stoking, sealing and feeding these kilns over 72 hours, bonds and community are built amongst ceramicists as they pass sunrise, afternoon, sunset, and moonrise in shifts, alternating company as the hours pass.  Bystanders in the ceramics department can always see when a woodfire is underway: the counters are littered with pizza boxes and empty drinks, and the detritus of small potluck meals. Students are smeared with ash, yet enlivened.  MSU can speak greatly to this celebration. According to alumni, Christine Gronneberg, whose work will be in East Fork, “The ceramics department at MSU offers its students a lot special experiences.  I fondly remember digging for wild clay, visiting the Archie Bray, firing atmospheric kilns, and having exceptional visiting artists at the studio.”

According to alumni Mark Croghan, also in East Fork, highlights the importance of the exhibition: “Anyone who fires with wood knows how hard it is. I’m just glad to share this with others whom know what it really takes.  the wood process is just that: process. It reeks of process and that’s what I’ve done my whole life. I love making pots but wood touches pots in ways that makes it a collaboration.”

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Danielle O’Malley

For more information on this exhibition, or on the Helen E. Copeland Gallery and Waller- Yoblonsky Gallery in general, please visit https://hecgallery.com or follow us on Facebook under the Helen E. Copeland Gallery and the Waller-Yoblonsky Gallery.  For information on the symposium in Helena, please visit https://www.culturalconfluencewoodfiresymposium.com.

The Helen E. Copeland Gallery is located at 213 Haynes Hall on the second floor of Haynes Hall, across from the Aasheim Gate off of 11th, with the Ski Swing out front. Please note that the parking passes are required for parking during the business day (6AM – 6PM). Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday, 9AM – 5PM/Closed on weekends.

The Waller-Yoblonsky Gallery at the Melvin Graduate Studios is located at 2998 W Lincoln Street off Garfield Street, east of 19th Street.  If coming from 19th, take a right onto Garfield, go ½ mile, and take a left into the Agricultural Experimentation Station.  there will be a sign for the Melvin Graduate Studios. Take a right and drive to the last building. Please mind the speed limit and stay beneath 15 MPH once you turn off of Garfield Street.

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Christine Gronneberg

 

CONTACT

Ella Watson – 406.994.4501 ella.watson@montana.edu

Josh DeWeese – 406.994.4501 josh.deweese@montana.edu


 

 

 

 

Giebink’s Cirque d’ Fantastical

wordpressThe School of Art at Montana State University is pleased to announce the opening of Giebink’s Cirque d’ Fantastical at the Helen E. Copeland located on the second floor of the School of Art in Haynes Hall, Bozeman, MT. The show will be on exhibit Monday, August 6th– Wednesday, September 25th. A reception will be held on Thursday, September 13th, 6:00 – 8:00 pm and will be free and open to the public. Hors d’oeuvres will be available, as will a cash bar.

On view will large-scale wooden sculptures, performances, and video installations by local artist Tom Giebink.  Having recently returned to Bozeman, Giebink brings with him a history in film, sculpture, and painting.  Beginning on a crew for community television in Austin, Texas in 1976, Giebink has followed the technical advancement of film production and editing. Giebink’s unique approach to the medium, spanning the decades, has pushed film and film editing to its limits.

According to Giebink, “Underlying virtually all my work over the last 50 years is the sense that I’m making visible & tangible what exists parallel to the world we walk around in.  Regardless of media used.  Regardless of what it looks like.  Regardless of how that might be performed.”

Creating video installations and performances, as in “All Pro Video Rasslin,” Giebink has entertained audiences by manipulating spatial relationships within the camera frame. For example, before CGI made such an endeavor simple, Giebink created anti-gravity rooms, which allowed him to casually walk up walls, and pour water at an impossible angle when viewed through the video frame.  Examples of this work will be on view in the gallery.

MeBedSimultaneously, Giebink has been creating stretched and skewed furniture that refers to the two-dimensional picture plane.  Resulting in a strange, yet still functional piece of furniture that is both playful and well crafted, Giebnick reproduces furniture to the exact proportions in a painting: if the legs of a bed are foreshortened in an image, then they are foreshortened in the sculpture.   Giebink echoes the aesthetics of Robert Lazzarini, resulting in structures are mystifying.

Finally, throughout the exhibition, Giebink will be installing a set in the gallery that incorporates the skewed furniture. Using live feeds and masterful computer knowledge with micro cameras, Giebink will create the set through August and September. This will allow viewers to understand how he manipulates the proportions of a film set to create an overall “anti-gravity” performance space in the gallery. The creation of this set will culminate in live performances in September with collaborator Norah Hajos. We welcome audiences to make frequent trips to the gallery to see how the installation unfolds over two months.

The HECG is located on the second floor of Haynes Hall, across from the Aasheim Gate off of 11th, with the Ski Swing out front. Please note that the parking passes are required for parking during the business day (6AM – 6PM). Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday, 9AM – 5PM/Closed on weekends.

For more information on this exhibition, or on the Helen E. Copeland Gallery in general, please visit www.hecgallery.com or follow us on Facebook at facebook.com/msuhecg.

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Ghosts: Selections from the PB Davidson Watermark Collection

ghostsThe Helen E. Copeland Gallery and the School of Art at Montana State University is pleased to announce the opening of Ghosts: Selections from the PB Davidson Watermark Collection  , currently on exhibit currently until Wednesday, July 25th, 2018.

On view will be watermarks, old letters, scientific research papers, and historical documents collected by paper chemist, PB Davidson.

In 2016, while going through the archives that had not been properly scoured since 1986, HECG Gallery Director, Ella Watson, came across an old cardboard box donning decades of dust, full of files with vague labels such as “States,” and “Animals.”  With that, she stepped into the hidden genius of PB Davidson, retired paper chemist and collector. As she spent an afternoon going through watermarks, currency, and old letters, she was stunned by their beauty and historical value.  For the next semester, Watson catalogued the 460+ pieces of paper in the PB Davidson Watermark Collection.  About 100 of those pieces of paper are on view in the HECG.

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The title Ghosts, references several aspects of the exhibit from the lost art of letter writing, to the historical documents, to the dying craft of the watermark. Watermarks themselves were a once celebrated art form that are rarely used in everyday transactions, except for currency.  However, in their heyday, watermarks were once used as a protection against counterfeit money and documents, as well as personal marks of businesses, countries, and families.

PB Davidson himself,  was one of those rare types of human being, in whom science and art merge seamlessly.  His appreciation of his craft and chemical expertise overlapped with his appreciation for a craft that has since begun to die. In his lifetime, he amassed an amazing collection of historical documents, letters, watermarks, and paper—to the extent that his enthusiasm for the material became public knowledge and associates would send him watermarks of their own.PB davidson

The walls of the front gallery of the HECG are adorned with old currency and letters, heralding back to a time when correspondence was an art, before emails urged us towards brevity and shorthand. There are references to the war effort of WWII and the rationing of paper; the invention of neoprene; and even the eerie solace of knowing that the DMV was just as particular in 1941 as it is today.

In glass cases are historical documents: there is an eighteen pence from 1776, printed for New Jersey, while the US was under the rule of King George III; a handwritten letter from 1776 discussing the decision by the Continental Congress to open ports to the international community except those under British Rule; pages from a Mercator Atlas; scientific notes by PB Davidson; confederate money; and a Congressional survey, asking whether or not Hawaii should become a state.

18 pence

There are also walls dedicated to the research of PB Davidson, who while receiving the Industrial Research Fellowship at Mellon Institute of Industrial Research, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, funded by the Strathmore Paper Company in late 1920s, developed much of the watercolor paper that is used today.

Finally, suspended like specters of a dying craft, watermarks hang from the ceiling so viewers can gaze at their translucent magnificence.

We cordially invite viewers to take time with this collection: come once, come again.  Bring your tea and savor a time when the written letter was an art form taught from grade school, before emails and “the cloud” forced us to share our deepest sentiments and memories in bytes and pixels. We urge you to take time with this collection as Dr. Davidson did, and readdress the ephemera of your own life, before your computer crashes and all these important pieces of your own life, your own era, get wiped away, vanish, and become Ghosts.

Special thanks to Jane Klockman, daughter of PB Davidson; Kathleen Rabel; and MSU Special Collections, specifically Kim Allen Scott and Heather Hultman, for helping organize this exhibition. 

The Helen E. Copeland Gallery is located on the second floor of Haynes Hall. Please note that the parking passes are required for parking during the business day (6AM – 6PM).

Helen E. Copeland Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday, 9AM – 5PM/ Closed on weekends

For more information on this exhibition, or on the Helen E. Copeland gallery in general, please visit http://hecgallery.com or follow us on Facebook (http://facebook.com/msuhecg).

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Spring 2018 BFA Thesis Exhibition

bfa spring 2018 poster

The School of Art at Montana State University is pleased to announce the opening of the 2018 Spring BFA Thesis Exhibition at the Helen E. Copeland located on the second floor of the School of Art in Haynes Hall, Bozeman, MT. The show will be on exhibit Wednesday, April 18th through Friday, May 4th, 2018. A reception will be held on Friday, May 4th, 2018 from 6:00-8:00 p.m. and will be free and open to the public. Hors d’oeuvres will be served, as will a cash bar.
On view will be the thesis works of 12 emerging artists graduating with their Bachelors Degrees in Fine Art. The following disciplines will be featured in the exhibition: drawing, painting, ceramics, printmaking, sculpture, and metalsmithing.
For BFA graduates, the thesis exhibition represents an important transition period from student to working artist. It marks an end to academically assigned work, and the beginning of their individual research and artistic maturity. The exhibited works synthesis the growth of each artist over their years spent at MSU.
The following students will be in the exhibition: Jason Baide, Brian Bigelow, Christy Brown, Emily Ferguson, Florence MacDonald, Catherine Schroeder, Kailey Slemp, Alisha Fisher, Kenzie Kvalsten, Alexander Peters, Megan Horner, and James Hogan. The subject matter will be as diverse as the students’ trades, discussing topics such as the archaic methods of cataloging old museums and Wunderkammern, Native identity, endangered species, the victories and loses of war, and anthropomorphism in jewelry.
In combination, these students have received grants, taken home places in national competitions around the country, and have had their own solo shows or participated in group shows during their time at Montana State University. This cohort exemplifies some of the best work that the MSU School of Art has to offer and we are personally excited to witness their future endeavors.
The 2018 Spring BFA Thesis Exhibition will be on view from Wednesday, April 18th – Friday, May 4th, 2018 in the Helen E. Copeland Gallery. The HECG is located on the second floor of Haynes Hall, across from the Aasheim Gate off of 11th, with the Ski Swing out front. Please note that the parking passes are required for parking during the business day (6AM – 6PM). Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday, 9AM – 5PM/Closed on weekends.
For more information on this exhibition, The 2018 Spring BFA Thesis Exhibition or on the Helen E. Copeland gallery in general, please visit http://www.hecgallery.com or follow us on Facebook at facebook.com/msuhecg and on Instagram.

 

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Same, Same, Different at the WYG

Same,Same,Different

The School of Art at MSU and the Waller-Yoblonsky Gallery are pleased to present Same, Same, Different, a mixed media cultural exchange project between school children in Dembayara, Guinea, West Africa and Bozeman, Montana. By placing two bodies of work together the children participate in cultural exchange and their artwork fills the space between them. A space that is usually filled with fear, discrimination, and economic disparity. The artist, Sarah Budeski, will be presenting the project she oversaw on location in Dembayara and Bozeman at the gallery, April 9th-13th. The closing reception will take place April 13th from 5:30-7:30.

Same, Same, Different is a three part show. It foremost includes the children’s project, “Authentic Me” a mixed media installation of relief prints and photography. She will also be showing “Expectation / Realization”, a body of work created by the artist, Sarah Budeski, inspired by her own experience crossing cultural and geographical borders. Lastly, she will present “The Vehicle” a inside look at the budding nonprofit organization that made the project possible.

Two groups of children participated in the project “Authentic Me.” One group from Dembayara a rural village in the high desert region of Guinea in West Africa, and the second from Bozeman, Montana, a mountain town in the Northwest United States – two vastly different places both geographically and culturally, yet both rich in their own unique ways. All of the materials used to make the relief prints were locally sourced. Sarah used these local resources as a way to talk about person and place, and how our homes influence our authentic self.

Engaging with subjects as artists allows them to claim their own image. This project works to give ownership of cultural and personal identity back to the subject and to break conventional ideas of portraiture. Children were empowered to show their authentic existence and innate right to human dignity by making relief prints (non-representational self-portraits) and documenting their lives through simple photography.

By placing this conversation in the hands of children, Sarah received a honest representation of the participants reality through their own eyes. Sarah desired to remove the bias that often plagues the photography of different cultures by foreign artists. This bias often manifests as a removed viewpoint instead of an authentic local perspective. When we remove this bias we are more accurately able to understand and empathize with each other. This project is about separation, it is about privilege, poverty, power and race – but it is also about love, family, and connectedness. A paradox that ultimately explains many corruptions of the world: misunderstanding of that which is different. Budeski says these differences can help us to come together, or divide us. It is our choice.

Proceeds from the artists work will go to the nonprofit Guinea Exchange in full.

About the Artist: Sarah Budeski is a second year Studio Art major at Montana State University. She enjoys both drawing and printmaking as her primary medium. Sarah has had a passion for West African culture ever since she started drumming in Bozeman with West African drum teacher, Chet Leach, at the age of seven. Sarah recently travelled to Guinea with project assistant, Kendall Levinson, to partake in drum and dance classes, continue work with Guinea Exchange, and complete the project Same, Same, Different. Sarah hopes to continue working on projects like this and sharing the authentic and beautiful identities of people across cultures and how we can affect and help each other in positive ways.

For more information contact Sarah Budeski, sarahbudeski@gmail.com, 406-600-5711.

 

 

Coping with the Landscape: Ryan Parker

Ryan,Parker_PosterThe Helen E. Copeland Gallery and the School of Art at Montana State University are pleased to announce the Master of Fine Art’s thesis exhibition of Ryan Keith Parker, Coping with the Landscape. The exhibition will take place at the Helen E. Copeland Gallery in Haynes Hall on the Montana State University campus in Bozeman, Montana, April 9th- April 13th, 2018 from 9:00 am- 5:00 pm. Parkers’ thesis defense will take place April 9th at 11 am – 12pm in the gallery. There will be a reception for Coping with the Landscape on Thursday April 12th 2018, from 6:00 – 8:00 pm. All events are open to the public. 

Coping with the Landscape refers to Parker’s fear of the state of the contemporary landscape– fear generated by the loss of humanity in the land that supports the movement of capital first, and the needs of the locality second. To cope, this series of photographs follows the intermediate zone, which crosses the borders of infrastructure space and domestic space, searching for a path through the land which is not prescribed. Illuminated by billboards and street lights, a plague of winter snow captures the turbulence felt by the occupants of the land, struggling to cope with the instability of this human-made landscape.
Parker received his BFA at University of Wyoming at Laramie in 2014 and has exhibited regionally and nationally during the last decade. Recently, he was invited to work collaboratively with photographer’s artists across the country in Overshadowed, a slow-motion time-lapse project recording the 2017 solar eclipse. Along with exhibitions, his work has been published in multiple magazines including an upcoming selection by Subjectively Objective and Float Photo Magazine for a joint venture entitled The Vernacular of Landscape.
The Helen E. Copeland Gallery is located on the second floor of Haynes Hall, across from the Aasheim Gate off of 11th, with the Ski Swing out front. Please note that the parking passes are required for parking during the business day (6AM – 6PM). Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday, 9AM – 5PM/Closed on weekends.

For more information on this exhibition or on the Helen E. Copeland gallery in general, please visit http://www.hecgallery.com or follow us on Instagram under helen.e.copeland .

 

Deep Now & The Seed Bank Project: Rachel Marne Jones

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The Helen E. Copeland Gallery and the School of Art at Montana State University are pleased to announce the Master of Fine Art’s thesis exhibition of Rachael Marne Jones, Deep Now & The Seed Bank Project.  The exhibition will take place at the Helen E. Copeland Gallery in Haynes Hall on the Montana State University campus in Bozeman, Montana, April 2nd– April 6th, 2018 from 9:00 am- 5:00 pm.

Jones’ thesis defense will take place April 2nd at 11 am – 12pm in the gallery.  There will be a  reception for Deep Now & The Seed Bank Project on Thursday, April 5th 2018, from 6:00 – 8:00 pm. All events are open to the public.

Deep Now & The Seed Bank Project will be comprised of sculptural works & drawings that challenge preconceptions engrained in modern society’s construction of linear time.  The industrial revolution has caused a massive shift in the way in which humans relate to each other, the environment, and everyday objects. Deep Now uses man-made forms in conjunction with geologic processes to emphasize the correlation between the simultaneous expanse and collapse of our understanding of time as dispensable and infinite.

Reflecting upon on the previous five extinctions on earth, the works are inspired by using geologic evidence to help predict our evolutionary path and encourage a more interconnected outlook on how to move forward for future generations. Grasping to understand the current ecological, political, and economic climate of our time, The Seed Bank Project focuses on the collaboration of cultures across the world to reliquarize seeds that have significant ecological and cultural value within the places they call home. Burying the seeds in porcelain seed banks specially designed to keep them viable for as long as their DNA will allow, The Seed Bank Project celebrates our global and technological advances, while instigating a dialogue of ecological stewardship among future generations.

More information about The Seed Bank Project and to see where banks have already been planted, please visit Marne’s personal artist website: www.rachaelmarnejones.com

According to Jones, “Through material manipulation and exploration, my work explores the parallels between states of being (human) and geological phenomena. Using references both to geologic and Darwin’s “Quick time”, distortions of perception through experience become visceral through the condensation of time. Each piece of sculpture acts as a snapshot of a specific experience I have shared with my immediate environment. Textures share both microscopic and macroscopic references while large expanses of naked porcelain evoke a sense of desolation and desperation. By beginning with a word, (usually not in circulation) an idea for a sculpture evolves. Through mind maps and drawings, the idea incubates into a three-dimensional sculpture. By working through a translation of experiences, I am attempting to more accurately understand my emotional responses and moral obligations to the rapidly evolving landscape of the 21st century.”

Rachael Marne received her BFA at University of Montana in Missoula in 2011 and is the founder of the Seed Bank Project, and has exhibited regionally and nationally.  Currently, she has work at the 2018 NCECA conference in Pittsburg in the Intercultural Exhibition.   She has also been accepted as the first artist Fellow in the Global Sustainability Fellows Program which will take place at the Arava Institute for Ecological studies in Israel this summer.

Following  Deep Now & The Seed Bank Project will be Ryan Parker, who will be presenting his thesis exhibition, Coping with the Landscape from Monday, April 9th  – Friday, April 13th, 2018.

The Helen E. Copeland Gallery is located on the second floor of Haynes Hall, across from the Aasheim Gate off of 11th, with the Ski Swing out front. Please note that the parking passes are required for parking during the business day (6AM – 6PM). Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday, 9AM – 5PM/Closed on weekends.

For more information on this exhibition or on the Helen E. Copeland gallery in general, please us on Facebook at facebook.com/msuhecg and Instagram under helen.e.copeland .